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[4]

HF 4x6 - Time to replace?

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Eddyde

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#31
Important trick: A blade that has the teeth "backwards" can be reversed by turning the blade "inside out". Like, flip the surface over and work it all the way around. Voila', the teeth will be facing the other way. I have to do this about one time in five as the process of taking the wire-wraps off and getting the blade out of the shrink-packaging has it come out "backwards".



Note that I only came across this stuff while researching my blade issues, but here are the sources:
http://www.starrett.com/docs/saw-resources/recommendations.pdf?sfvrsn=2 (This is from the blade manufacturer)
http://www.bandsawblade.com/breakin.htm (Similar here)
https://www.sawblade.com/breaking-in-band-saw-blades.cfm (and again)
http://www.wikussawtech.com/index.php/en/einfahren (another blade manufacturer)

So like I said, this was all news to me, so I'm not preaching this stuff as gospel, just that I discovered yet another thing that I, as an untrained amateur, hadn't heard of until now that could be affecting blade life.
Wow, I guess there's some truth to it then. One of those things that doesn't seem to make sense but...
 

bob308

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#32
I bought a 4x6 saw 35 years ago. the motor went out in 6 years. I put a new u.s. motor on it and it has run good ever since. I did have to stiffen up the base. mine cuts straight just takes it time. they do not like to be pushed.
rule is you should have 3 teeth in the metal when sawing even if you have to use a finer blade. tubing will tear up a blade use the finest blade you can get.
I would rebuild the saw you have . most people considerer the h-f a kit.
 

Dabbler

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#33
I've been lurking on this thread since it started, but If I may, I'll add my .02 - I greatly prefer the rebuilding of older machines, which are usually stiffer, stronger and more dimensionally stable than the new ones. I know it isn't everyone's cup of tea, but if you can I'd keep/rebuild the old one.
 

Rudy_R

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#34
My bed frame isn't made of mystery metal... It also won't sag. 2" square tube with 7 legs with machine leveling feet. Doesn't squeak, doesn't shake, doesn't move. Two halves bolt together to make it easy to move. If only you could buy them like this from a store, I wouldn't have to make my own.

 
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coffmajt

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#35
My bed frame isn't made of mystery metal... It also won't sag. 2" square tube with 7 legs with machine leveling feet. Doesn't squeak, doesn't shake, doesn't move. Two halves bolt together to make it easy to move. If only you could buy them like this from a store, I wouldn't have to make my own.


Composition of bed frames can run the gamut on hardness because they are mostly made from remelted scrap steel and carbon content can vary greatly. With high carbon you can get carbide precipitation resulting in very hard spots, which will kill even a bi metal blade. For blade speeds I like 100 sfpm unless all you cut is aluminum. On hardened alloys even 100 is too fast. Jack
 
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