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Infeed/Outfeed Stands for Band Saw

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coolidge

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#1
I went looking for stands for my new band saw and balked at the $99 (or more) for these single roller stands I had used in the past. Trying to adjust one to the exact height of my saw had been a pain, pinched/crushed hands when I lost my grip on the thing, I wanted something easier to adjust.

I settled on these V jack welding stands instead, folds up, carry handle welded right on, 2,500 lsb capacity, and best of all only $80 at my local supply house, WINNER!!

NOTE: My Jet J-9225 zip miter band saw is pretty high off the floor so I went with the high jack model adjustable from 28 to 49 inches. You might need the low jack model adjustable from 21 to 36 inches for your saw.

Model I Purchased - http://www.acmetool.com/index.jsp?p...D=,Sumner.Manufacturing,Pipe.Stands.and.Vises

Other Models - http://www.sumner.com/sumner/sub/productb/galmodel.29.7.9.29.0.0.html

I figure I can make a flat adapter for the V easily enough. Just thought I would post these as they were a good solution to my need.

They are large and heavy, I like it.



BIG 1.5 inch ACME threads! 1 inch fall guard under washer for hand safety. That T hand nut locks it in place roughly, then fine adjustment using the ACME screw and locks with the big cast ball end nut.



 

tweinke

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#2
Nice looking stands, they should do the trick. Way nicer then the HF frustration causing stand I use in my shop!
 

coolidge

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Nice looking stands, they should do the trick. Way nicer then the HF frustration causing stand I use in my shop!
Exactly, and cost less than the stands at Woodcraft/Rockler. Way less than the cast iron PalmGren stands I had before which were bad boys, but no easier to adjust. Some are selling those Palmgren stands now for close to $200. At that price I would make my own stands, no way I could make these stands with the ACME threads and features for $80 it was a no brainer.
 

FOMOGO

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#4
Those look like they should be very useful. Nice score at that price. Mike
 

terrywerm

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#5
They are nice looking stands, but I must caution you, they do have a hidden problem, similar to a problem I personally encountered once, some years back. I will no longer use a stand that does not have a free turning roller. Here is what happened:

I was needing to cut some lengths of 6" diameter steel pipe with about a 1/4" wall, so we placed the pipe on the horizontal cutoff bandsaw with the far end supported on a shop built roller stand. Sadly, the roller stand was simply a piece of 3/4" pipe over a length of 5/8" solid rod, there were no bearings. With the weight of that 6" pipe resting on it, the roller would not easily turn when attempting to move the pipe, but I did not realize this at the time.

I was getting ready to make the first cut, but had to slide the pipe a bit to end up with the correct length. When I grabbed the pipe and tried to slide it, it was very difficult to move. Okay, that's to be expected, after all, that piece of pipe was heavy. So, I pulled a little harder and the pipe moved. Then there was a sudden noise, and the pipe moved in a vertical manner that was not expected. Since the roller did not want to turn, the stand tipped over when the pipe was moved. The problem is that the pipe pushed my left hand right up onto the blade of the saw, which luckily was not running at the time. Despite that fact, two of my fingers were pushed solidly up onto the blade. I had to PULL my fingers off of the blade.

A ride to the emergency room and two surgeries later my fingers are both functioning normally, but I can guarantee you, the first thing I did when I got back to the shop was to make a new head for the roller stand, one that utilized a pair of rollers with ball bearings in them. I also extended the base of the stand so that it would not tip over very easily in the future.
 

coolidge

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I hear what you are saying Terry, but if the pipe rolled off the end of the roller stand, same situation right. These stands are heavy, I don't see them tipping over when exercising normal shop safety. ;)
 

terrywerm

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Yes, the same thing would occur if the end of the pipe rolled off the stand, and I completely understand what you are saying. I was just pointing out a possible hazard for anyone that, like me, did not recognize the hazard before hand. With no rollers on the top, it would be obvious to most that a person would need to allow for that fact, but some folks might just assume that the stock would slide on the stand. After what I went through I would much rather point it out for the benefit of others rather than hear of the same thing occurring for someone else.

Those are NICE stands, I may consider a pair myself. It seems there are never enough supports around for various projects, and I really like the heavy acme threads and especially that they fold up and take up little space when stored away.
 

coolidge

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#8
Your injury...ouch! You made a very valid point on safety. My great grandfather had a missing thumb, my grandfather had a missing thumb, so I try to stay focused on safety around cutting tools and I still have all my body parts thank Christ. Not that I haven't had some close calls for being stupid and a few stitches.
 

Charles Spencer

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#9
I came across a no-cost solution once. Two guys were renovating a large old farm house. I met them because they were selling a few sheets of 3/4" birch plywood they had left over (cheap). I commented on their setup for cutting them. They told me that was way better than what they used to do. They said that they would rest one end on the table saw, one of them would bend over and rest it on his back, and the other one would then feed it into the blade.

Not that I'm recommending that of course.
 
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