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Kalamazoo 9a-w Saw Restore

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RandyHut

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#1
I just purchased a kalamazoo 9a-w band saw from a used machine dealer. It is going to need some work, however it seems to be mostly there, and it runs. It looks worse than it is, i think. It has no blade on it and i can't seem to find for certain what size blade it requires. I even have a manual from Kalamazoo that is somewhat vague. One place it refers to the saw as 3/4" and in other places including the blade size chart is say 1". Any of you have a model 9A-W Kalamazoo saw?
Any thing i should look for as i start the restore?

For full disclosure, i have this same post on another forum, done before i realized this site is a better fit for me.
 

Bob Korves

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#2
At least you ended up at the right place! Welcome to hobby machinist! Sorry, I don't know the answer to your saw question, but someone here will probably know and give you a useful and friendly answer.
 

rgray

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#3
Google found me this on a site that was selling one: Blade 10' 10 1/2" x 3/4" x .032"
Another one had this size: BLADE SIZE ......................... 1"x.035"x10'10 1/2"
So a quick measurement with a tape measure should verify if the length is right. Then it probably is capable of taking either width blade. By width I mean 3/4 or 1 inch.
 
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RandyHut

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#4
Yes, i checked it with a tape and the length looks good, need to know the width bfore ordering a new blade
 

neilho

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Yes, i checked it with a tape and the length looks good, need to know the width bfore ordering a new blade
Don't have a Kalamazoo, but measuring the distance from the edge of the wheel to the flange should give a hint. The teeth should stick out just beyond the wheel so if that distance is 5/8" or so blade width is prob 3/4"; if the distance is 7/8" or so blade width is prob 1".

You're right to take the manual specs with a grain of salt- the manual for my Kysor Johnson recommended a blade that was 1" too long. I used my 16' metal tape measure to verify the wrong length- apparently I didn't pull it tight enough. Using my flat 100' tape gave more accurate results.
 

Bob Korves

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#6
Sometimes the pulleys are chamfered for tooth clearance. In any case, the blade teeth should not run on the flat of the pulley or the tooth set will flatten on one side, making the blade cut crooked. On some saws the teeth overhang the pulley, on others the teeth clear a chamfer, so they require no overhang of the blade.
 

RandyHut

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#7
Thanks Guys!
I knew this was the right place. Several responses with great info from here, nothing from the other.
Here is a pic of the BEFORE saw. So far i know that it runs, and the gear box seems smooth and quite, the vise clamp seems to work ok, the hydraulic piston holds and lowers ok.
needs some work on the blade guides, and a good cleaning and some new paint. The tray for the coolant needs some repair and the coolant pump is missing. However i got it for almost scrap price, so i can put a few dollars into it and hopefully have a much better saw than a HF saw, and this thing will cut a 9" dia.
 

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RandyM

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#8
What a great project Randy. I am really interested in keeping tabs on you progress. She is going to turn out fantastic.
 

RandyHut

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#10
need some help. Does anyone with a 9a saw know the bearing number for the blade bearings on the blade guides? mine are all missing.
 

RandyHut

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#11
Well i had some time tis afternoon so i decided to clean up the saw a bit. I removed the coolant tank and then cleaned then covers and the base with some degreaser and some warm water and soap. That alone makes the saw look much better. I in the process found that one spring is missing from the counter balance system. here are a couple pics of the cleaning
 

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RandyHut

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#13
Well ran into a bigger problem when i pulled the gear box for inspection. The box is fine, the output shaft and the 14" pulley have a lot of slop between them. after cleaning everything up, the shaft is worn and the pulley id is worn and out round, and cracked. I can make a new shaft for the gear box, no problem. the 14" pulley is another issue.
 

Dabbler

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#14
Is the full 14" required? 12" pulleys are readily available and not too expensive...
 

RandyHut

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#15
Dabbler,
yes the way this machine is made they need to be pretty close to 14". Thinking about trying to fabricate one up from bar stock and a good center hub.
 

Dabbler

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#16
So the outside rim is still intact, then?
 

coffmajt

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#17
is the 14 inch wheel cast iron? If so, you should be able to braze repair and then machine the bore back to size - Mig or Tig repair the worn shaft and you should have a great saw == Jack
 

RandyHut

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#18
My research on brazing cast iron is telling me that it is difficult to do with good success. I found a used pulley for a decentprice on E-bay (confirmed with seller that the bore is good, and that is in good usable condition) before ordering. Will probably try and use it in place of the one i have.
So i am at either welding up the current shaft and using it or turning a new one and keying it.
Need set of bearings and seals for the gearbox and we should be up and running.

Probably be a week or so for all the parts to arrive and me to get to the repairs.
 

Bob Korves

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#19
Any kind of repair to cast iron is fussy. Brazing works well, done correctly. So does welding, again, done correctly. Both will fail if not done correctly. The basics are: Vee out the crack all the way into the material, leaving just enough original metal to locate the parts together. Made sure that the metal is clean and without contaminants like oil and paint. Preheat the cast iron thoroughly before welding or brazing. Use plenty of the correct flux when brazing. Carefully follow the manufacturer's instructions when welding. As soon as the welding or brazing is completed the work must immediately be wrapped in welding thermal blankets or buried deep in dry sand to cool very slowly. Do it correctly and it will work just fine. If you try to cut corners or use equipment and consumables meant for other welding techniques, you will almost certainly fail immediately, or end up with work that will fail in service. A good brazed or welded repair is just as strong as the original iron.

Disclaimer: I am not really a welder. But I have been around it enough to have seen lots of good and poor work, and the difference is in having a welder wno knows what he/she is doing and takes pride in doing good work.
 

RandyHut

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#20
Well some good news, my replacement wheel cam in and seems to be in good shape. The shaft has been welded up and turned to fit the wheel, with anew key way cut.
Had to order two new bearings for the wheel shaft, so it will be next week before i get to put the gear box back together and on the machine. Found someone to weld me up a new blade and that should be done by the time the bearings are in.
 

RandyHut

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#21
Well more good news, bearings came in, and the gear box is all cleaned out, and rebuilt with new bearings and seal and new gear oil. All is in good shape now. Next step is the blade and adjusting every thing so it will cut. this old saw is starting to look like it might just have another 20 years left in it, might just out last me. still could use a good stripping and repaint (this spring).
 

RandyHut

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#22
Well i got the blade and got it on the saw, and adjusted so that it tracks good. The blade guides are shot and they will need replaced. One step at a time i am getting the things fixed and back to a usable state. Looks like first of the week should be cutting my first parts
 

markba633csi

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#23
Lot of work to refurbish a bandsaw, I discovered. Lots of parts, bearings (12 in mine not counting 2 in the motor; replaced all but 1) fasteners and surface area to clean (yuk). Not to mention tweaks and upgrades. Good project for the long winter though. Hopefully the labor saved will more than cancel out the work put in...
Mark S.
 
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